EARLY YEARS 1

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

 

Subject Specific Outcomes

Early Years 1 – English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students will be working on this year?

Oral Language – Listening and Speaking (Phase 1)

  • Repeat/echo single words
  • Understand simple questions and respond with actions or words
  • Use gestures, actions, body language and/or words to communicate needs and to express ideas
  • Name classmates, teachers and familiar classroom and playground objects
  • Interact effectively with peers and adults in familiar social settings
  • realize that people speak different languages
  • use the mother tongue (with translation, if necessary) to express needs and explain ideas
  • realize that word order can change from one language to another
  • Use single words and two-word phrases in context
  • Follow classroom directions and routines, using context cues
  • tell their own stories using words, gestures, and objects/ artefacts
  • listen and respond to picture books, showing pleasure, and demonstrating their understanding through gestures, expression and/or words

Viewing and presenting (Phase 1)

  • recognize familiar signs, labels and logos, for example, pedestrian walking sign, emergency exit sign, no dogs allowed; identify similarities and differences
  • attend to visual information showing understanding through play, gestures, facial expression
  • observe visual cues that indicate context; show understanding by matching pictures with context
  • make personal connections to visual texts, for example, a picture book about children making friends in a new situation
  • show appreciation of illustrations in picture books by selecting and rereading familiar books, focusing on favourite pages
  • reveal their own feelings in response to visual presentations, for example, by showing amusement, curiosity, surprise

Reading (Phase 1)

  • Handle books, showing an understanding of how a book works, for example, cover, beginning, directional movement, end
  • Join in with chants, poems, songs, word games and clapping games, gaining familiarity with the sounds and patterns of the language of instruction.
  • Enjoy listening to stories
  • Choose and “read” picture books for pleasure
  • Listen attentively and respond to stories read aloud
  • Make connections to their own experience when listening to or “reading” texts
  • Recognize their own first name
  • distinguish between pictures and written text, for example, can point to a picture when asked
  • show curiosity and ask questions about pictures or text
  • begin to discriminate between visual representations such as symbols, numbers, ICT iconography, letters and words
  • show empathy for characters in a story
  • participate in shared reading, joining in with rhymes, refrains and repeated text as they gain familiarity
  • express opinions about the meaning of a story

Writing (Phase 1)

  • Experiment with writing using different writing implements and media
  • use their own experience as a stimulus when drawing and “writing”
  • differentiate between illustrations and written text
  • show curiosity and ask questions about written language
  • begin to discriminate between letters/characters, numbers and symbols
  • listen and respond to shared books (enlarged texts), observing conventions of print, according to the language(s) of instruction

Early Years 1 Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students will be working on this year?

Social organization and culture

Continuity and Change Through Time

  • identify changes he or she has undergone from birth to present (for example, discuss with classmates what changes their families have undergone in their lifetimes)
  • use primary sources (such as parents and grandparents) to identify reasons for documenting personal history
  • identify the communities he or she belongs to (for example, draw and describe pictures of the various groups they form a part of)
  • place events from his or her life in chronological order (for example, using personal photos).
  • demonstrate ability to apply existing rules and routines to work and play with others.
  • suggest some suitable rules and routines for the class

Skills:

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society

Early Years 1 Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Phase 1)

  • count to determine the number of objects in a set
  • use number words and numerals to represent quantities in real-life situations
  • understand one-to-one correspondence
  • understand that, for a set of objects, the number name of the last object counted describes the quantity of the whole set 

Pattern and Function (Phase 1)

  • understand that patterns can be found in everyday situations, for example, sounds, actions, objects, nature.
  • extend and create patterns.
  • describe patterns in various ways, for example, using words, drawings, symbols, materials, actions, numbers.

Data Handling (Phase 1)

  • sort and label real objects by attributes.
  • describe real objects and events by attributes.
  • create pictographs and tally marks
  • create living graphs using real objects and people

Measurement (Phase 1)

  • identify, compare and describe attributes of real objects, for example, longer, shorter, heavier, empty, full, hotter, colder
  • describe observations about events and objects in real-life situation
  • understand that events in daily routines can be described and sequenced, for example, before, after, bedtime, storytime, today, tomorrow.

Shape and Space (Phase 1)

  • understand that 2D and 3D shapes have characteristics that can be described and compared

Early Years 1 Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Earth and Space

  • talk about activities that occur during the day and night
  • compare activities that occur during the seasons
  • make connections between the weather and how to protect himself or herself
  • identify simple patterns in daily and seasonal cycles
  • observe the features of the local environment that are affected by daily and seasonal cycles.

Living things

  • observe the needs of living things that enable them to stay healthy
  • observe and describe the characteristics of living and non-living things
  • take responsibility for living things found in his or her environment.

Skills:

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Use scientific vocabulary to explain their observations and experiences.
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored.
  • Make and test predictions.

Early Years 1 Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students will be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 1)

  • explore body and untuned percussion instrument sounds
  • recognize different sources of music in daily life
  • use voice to imitate sounds and learn songs
  • move their bodies to express the mood of the music
  • distinguish the sounds of different instruments in music

Music – Creating (Phase 1)

  • create and accompany music using a variety of sounds and instruments
  • play untuned percussion instruments in time with a beat
  • use the voice and body to create musical patterns
  • explore sound as a means of expressing imaginative ideas
  • recreate sounds from familiar experiences
  • participate in performing and creating music both individually and collectively

Drama – Responding (Phase 1)

  • respond to live performances, stories and plays from other times and/or places
  • talk about ideas and feelings in response to dramatic performances
  • use materials to symbolically show location and character

Drama – Creating (Phase 1)

  • engage in imaginative play using a range of stimuli
  • develop the ability to cooperate and communicate with others in creating drama
  • explore familiar roles, themes and stories dramatically
  • create roles in response to props, set and costumes

 EARLY YEARS 2

  • The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.
  • It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.
  • Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.
  • The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

Early Years 2 English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students will be working on this year?

Listening and speaking (Phase 1)

  • realize that people speak different languages
  • interact effectively with peers and adults in familiar social settings
  • join in with poems, rhymes, songs and repeated phrases in shared books
  • listen and respond to picture books, showing pleasure, and demonstrating their understanding through gestures, expression and/or words

Viewing and presenting (Phase 1)

  • reveal their own feelings in response to visual presentations, for example, by showing amusement, curiosity, surprise
  • observe visual cues that indicate context; show understanding by matching pictures with context
  • recognize familiar signs, labels and logos, for example, pedestrian walking sign, emergency exit sign, no dogs allowed; identify similarities and differences
  • make personal connections to visual texts, for example, a picture book about children making friends in a new situation
  • use body language to communicate and to convey understanding, for example, pointing, gesturing, facial expressions
  • select and incorporate colours, shapes, symbols and images into visual presentations
  • listen to terminology associated with visual texts and understand terms such as colour, shape, size.

Reading (Phase 1)

  • Distinguish between pictures and written text, for example, can point to a picture when asked
  • join in with chants, poems, songs, word games and clapping games, gaining familiarity with the sounds and patterns of the language of instruction.
  • participate in shared reading, joining in with rhymes, refrains and repeated text as they gain familiarity
  • handle books, showing an understanding of how a book works, for example, cover, beginning, directional movement, end.
  • show empathy for characters in a story
  • locate and respond to aspects of interest in self- selected texts (pointing, examining pictures closely, commenting)
  • realize that the organization of on-screen text is different from how text is organized in a book
  • show curiosity and ask questions about pictures or text
  • begin to understand sound-symbol relationships and recognize familiar sounds/symbols/words of the language community

Writing (Phase 1)

  • differentiate between illustrations and written text • use their own experience as a stimulus when drawing and “writing”
  • begin to discriminate between letters/characters, numbers and symbols
  • write their own name independently.
  • experiment with writing using different writing implements and media
  • listen and respond to shared books (enlarged texts), observing conventions of print, according to the language(s) of instruction
  • choose to write as play, or in informal situations, for example, filling in forms in a pretend post office, writing a menu or wish list for a party
  • participate in shared writing, observing the teacher’s writing and making suggestions

Early Years 2 Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students will be working on this year?

Social organization and culture

Change and Continuity Through Time

  • identify changes he or she has undergone from birth to present (for example, discuss with classmates what changes their families have undergone in their lifetimes)
  • use primary sources (such as parents and grandparents) to identify reasons for documenting personal history
  • talk about the different ways in which family history can be documented
  • place events from his or her life in chronological order (for example, using personal photos).
  • reflect on a journey he or she has taken and what was learned from it
  • represent some of the journeys he or she has made (for example, through drawing or role play)

Social organization and culture

Human System and Economic Activities

identify the communities he or she belongs to (for example, draw and describe pictures of the various groups they form a part of)

  • talk about the reasons that rules are necessary in the various communities to which he or she belongs
  • suggest some suitable rules and routines for the class
  • demonstrate ability to apply existing rules and routines to work and play with others.
  • recognize how his or her choices and behaviours affect learning in the classroom (for example, respond to various picture and story prompts to explain how one person’s actions can impact others).

Skills

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society
  • Orientate in relation to place and time.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.

Early Years 2 Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Phase 1)

  • understand one-to-one correspondence
  • understand that, for a set of objects, the number name of the last object counted describes the quantity of the whole set
  • connect number names and numerals to the quantities they represent.
  • count to determine the number of objects in a set
  • use the language of mathematics to compare quantities in real-life situations, for example, more, less, first, second
  • use number words and numerals to represent quantities in real-life situations
  • understand that numbers can be constructed in multiple ways, for example, by combining and partitioning

Pattern and Function (Phase 1)

  • understand that patterns can be found in everyday situations, for example, sounds, actions, objects, nature.
  • extend and create patterns.
  • describe patterns in various ways, for example, using words, drawings, symbols, materials, actions, numbers.

Data Handling (Phase 1)

  • sort and label real objects by attributes.
  • describe real objects and events by attributes.
  • create pictographs and tally marks
  • create living graphs using real objects and people
  • understand that sets can be organized by different attributes
  • understand that information about themselves and their surroundings can be obtained in different ways
  • describe real objects and events by attributes.
  • discuss chance in daily events (impossible, maybe, certain).
  • represent information through pictographs and tally marks

Measurement (Phase 1)

  • identify, compare and describe attributes of real objects, for example, longer, shorter, heavier, empty, full, hotter, colder
  • describe observations about events and objects in real-life situation
  • understand that events in daily routines can be described and sequenced, for example, before, after, bedtime, storytime, today, tomorrow.
  • compare the length, mass and capacity of objects using non- standard units

Shape and Space (Phase 1)

  • understand that 2D and 3D shapes have characteristics that can be described and compared
  • sort, describe and compare
  • describe position and direction, for example, inside, outside, above, below, next to, behind, in front of, up, down.
  • explore and describe the paths, regions and boundaries of their immediate environment (inside, outside, above, below) and their position (next to, behind, in front of, up, down).

Early Years 2 Science 

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Living Things

  • observe and describe the characteristics of living and non-living things
  • observe the needs of living things that enable them to stay healthy
  • take responsibility for living things found in his or her environment.
  • identify the parts of plants that are used by other living things (for example, for food, shelter, tools)
  • be aware of the role of plants in sustaining life (for example, providing oxygen, food)
  • show responsibility when caring for plants.

Materials and Matter

  • use senses to describe observable properties of familiar materials (including solids, liquids, gases)
  • describe observable changes (including changes of state) that occur in materials
  • recognize that materials can be solid, liquid or gas
  • be aware of how to change water into a solid, liquid and gas
  • apply understanding of basic properties of materials in order to match materials to purpose (for example, waterproofing, insulating).

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary.
  • Make and test predictions.
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions.

Early Years 2 Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students will be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 1)

  • explore body and untuned percussion instrument sounds
  • recognize different sources of music in daily life
  • describe how music makes them feel
  • describe the differences in music

Music – Creating (Phase 1)

  • create and accompany music using a variety of sounds and instruments
  • play untuned percussion instruments in time with a beat
  • use the voice and body to create musical patterns
  • explore sound as a means of expressing imaginative ideas
  • recreate sounds from familiar experiences

Visual Arts – Responding (Phase 1)

  • enjoy experiencing artworks
  • make personal connections to artworks

Visual Arts – Creating (Phase 1)

  • engage with, and enjoy a variety of visual arts experiences
  • take responsibility for the care of tools and materials
  • use their imagination and experiences to inform their art making
  • create artwork in response to a range of stimuli

PYP 1 (Grade 1 ) 

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

PYP1 (Grade 1) English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students will be working on this year?

Listening and Speaking (Phase 2)

  • describe personal experiences
  • use language to address their needs, express feelings and opinions
  • use oral language to communicate during classroom activities, conversations and imaginative play
  • listen and respond in small or large groups for increasing periods of time
  • listen to and enjoy stories read aloud; show understanding by responding in oral, written or visual form
  • talk about the stories, writing, pictures and models they have created
  • obtain simple information from accessible spoken texts
  • ask questions to gain information and respond to inquiries directed to themselves or the class
  • memorize and join in with poems, rhymes and songs

Viewing and Presenting (Phase 2)

  • talk about their own feelings in response to visual messages; show empathy for the way others might feel
  • observe and discuss illustrations in picture books and simple reference books, commenting on the information being conveyed (social
  • attend to visual information showing understanding through discussion, role play, illustrations
  • realize that shapes, symbols and colours have meaning and include them in presentations
  • connect visual information with their own experiences to construct their own meaning, for example, when taking a trip
  • observe visual images and begin to appreciate, and be able to express, that they have been created to achieve particular purposes.
  • use a variety of implements to practise and develop handwriting and presentation skills

Reading (Phase 2)

  • listen attentively and respond actively to read- aloud situations; make predictions, anticipate possible outcomes
  • make connections between personal experience and storybook characters
  • understand sound-symbol relationships and recognize familiar sounds/symbols/words of the language community
  • read and understand the meaning of self-selected and teacher-selected texts at an appropriate level
  • participate in learning engagements involving reading aloud – taking roles and reading dialogue, repeating refrains from familiar stories, reciting poems.
  • instantly recognize an increasing bank of high-frequency and high-interest words, characters or symbols
  • have a secure knowledge of the basic conventions of the language(s) of instruction in printed text, for example, orientation, directional movement, layout, spacing, punctuation

Writing (Phase 2)

  • form letters/characters conventionally and legibly, with an understanding as to why this is important within a language community
  • read their own writing to the teacher and to classmates, realizing that what they have written remains unchanged
  • participate in shared and guided writing, observing the teacher’s model, asking questions and offering suggestions
  • write informally about their own ideas, experiences and feelings in a personal journal or diary, initially using simple sentence structures, for example, “I like …”, “I can …” , “I went to …”, “I am going to …”
  • create illustrations to match their own written text
  • demonstrate an awareness of the conventions of written text, for example, sequence, spacing, directionality
  • connect written codes with the sounds of spoken language and reflect this understanding when recording ideas
  • write to communicate a message to a particular audience, for example, a news story, instructions, a fantasy story
  • have a secure knowledge of the basic conventions of the language(s) of instruction in printed text, for example, orientation, directional movement, layout, spacing, punctuation

PYP1 (Grade 1) Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students will be working on this year?

Resources and the environment

Human Systems and Economic Activities

  • compare transportation systems within the local community to those in other communities
  • explain how and why changes in transport have occurred over time
  • examine the impact of technological advances in transport on the environment.
  • describe the natural features of local and other environments
  • analyse ways in which humans use the natural environment (for example, recreation, settlements)

Social organization and culture

  • explain why a particular celebration is important in his or her own life
  • suggest reasons for various celebrations
  • identify and compare traditions and celebrations observed by others in the class
  • use a variety of sources to gain information about celebrations from both a historical and a cultural perspective

Skills

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
  • Use and analyse evidence from a variety of historical, geographical and societal sources.
  • Orientate in relation to place and time.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.
  • Assess the accuracy, validity and possible bias of sources.

PYP1 (Grade 1) Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Phase 1)

  • understand one-to-one correspondence
  • understand that, for a set of objects, the number name of the last object counted describes the quantity of the whole set
  • connect number names and numerals to the quantities they represent.
  • count to determine the number of objects in a set
  • use the language of mathematics to compare quantities in real-life situations, for example, more, less, first, second
  • use number words and numerals to represent quantities in real-life situations
  • understand that numbers can be constructed in multiple ways, for example, by combining and partitioning

Pattern and Function (Phase 1)

  • understand that patterns can be found in everyday situations, for example, sounds, actions, objects, nature.
  • extend and create patterns.
  • describe patterns in various ways, for example, using words, drawings, symbols, materials, actions, numbers.

Data Handling (Phase 1)

  • understand that patterns can be found in everyday situations, for example, sounds, actions, objects, nature.
  • extend and create patterns.
  • describe patterns in various ways, for example, using words, drawings, symbols, materials, actions, numbers.
  • sort and label real objects by attributes.
  • describe real objects and events by attributes.
  • create pictographs and tally marks
  • create living graphs using real objects and people
  • understand that sets can be organized by different attributes
  • understand that information about themselves and their surroundings can be obtained in different ways
  • discuss chance in daily events (impossible, maybe, certain).

Measurement (Phase 1)

  • identify, compare and describe attributes of real objects, for example, longer, shorter, heavier, empty, full, hotter, colder
  • describe observations about events and objects in real-life situation
  • understand that events in daily routines can be described and sequenced, for example, before, after, bedtime, storytime, today, tomorrow.
  • compare the length, mass and capacity of objects using non- standard units

Shape and Space (Phase 1)

  • understand that 2D and 3D shapes have characteristics that can be described and compared
  • sort, describe and compare 3D shapes
  • describe position and direction, for example, inside, outside, above, below, next to, behind, in front of, up, down.
  • explore and describe the paths, regions and boundaries of their immediate environment (inside, outside, above, below) and their position (next to, behind, in front of, up, down).

PYP1 (Grade 1) Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Earth and Space

  • describe the natural features of local and other environments (for example, underlying geology)
  • analyse ways in which humans use the natural environment
  • identify or generate a question or problem to be explored in relation to human impact on the local environment.
  • recognize that imagination contributes to scientific developments
  • explore the use of imagination as a tool to solve problems (for example, particular inventions, scientific discoveries).
  • examine how people use air in their everyday lives (for example, transportation, recreation)

Materials and Matter

  • reflect on and self-assess his or her personal use of natural resources
  • investigate ways that familiar materials can be reused
  • group materials on the basis of properties for the purpose of recycling
  • describe how a particular material is recycled
  • explore the role of living things in recycling energy and matter.

Living things (Age 5-7)

  • recognize that living things, including humans, need certain resources for energy and growth
  • investigate the responses of plants or animals to changes in their habitats.
  • identify or generate a question or problem to be explored in relation to human impact on the local environment.
  • explore the role of living things in recycling energy and matter.

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored.
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary.
  • Make and test predictions.
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions.

PYP1 Grade 1 Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students will be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 2)

  • express their responses to music from different cultures and styles
  • sing individually and in unison
  • recognize music from a basic range of cultures and styles
  • explore individually or collectively a musical response to a narrated story

Music – Creating (Phase 2)

  • create music to represent different cultures and styles
  • explore vocal sounds, rhythms, instruments, timbres to communicate ideas and feelings
  • create a soundscape based on personal experiences

Visual Arts – Responding (Phase 2)

  • describe similarities and differences between artworks
  • investigate the purposes of artwork from different times, places and a range of cultures including their own

Creating (Phase 2)

  • plan and make specific choices of materials, tools and processes

    demonstrate control of tools, materials and processes

PYP2 ( Grade 2)

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

PYP2 (Grade 2) English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students will be working on this year?

Listening and speaking (Phase 2)

  • follow two-step directions
  • predict likely outcomes when listening to texts read aloud
  • use oral language to communicate during classroom activities, conversations and imaginative play
  • talk about the stories, writing, pictures and models they have created
  • follow instructions, showing understanding
  • use language to address their needs, express feelings and opinions
  • ask questions to gain information and respond to inquiries directed to themselves or the class
  • listen and respond in small or large groups for increasing periods of time
  • listen to and enjoy stories read aloud; show understanding by responding in oral, written or visual form
  • describe personal experiences
  • obtain simple information from accessible spoken texts
  • use grammatical rules of the language(s) of instruction (learners may overgeneralize at this stage).

Viewing and presenting (Phase 2)

  • relate to different contexts presented in visual texts according to their own experiences, for example, “that looks like my uncle’s farm.”
  • observe and discuss illustrations in picture books and simple reference books, commenting on the information being conveyed
  • observe visual images and begin to appreciate, and be able to express, that they have been created to achieve particular purposes.
  • use a variety of implements to practise and develop handwriting and presentation skills
  • realize that shapes, symbols and colours have meaning and include them in presentations
  • through teacher modelling, become aware of terminology used to tell about visual effects, for example, features, layout, border, frame observe visual images and begin to appreciate, and be able to express, that they have been created to achieve particular purposes.
  • talk about their own feelings in response to visual messages; show empathy for the way others might feel
  • locate familiar visual texts in magazines, advertising catalogues, and connect them with associated products

Reading (Phase 2)

  • read and understand the meaning of self-selected and teacher-selected texts at an appropriate level
  • make connections between personal experience and storybook characters
  • participate in learning engagements involving reading aloud – taking roles and reading dialogue, repeating refrains from familiar stories, reciting poems.
  • instantly recognize an increasing bank of high-frequency and high-interest words, characters or symbols
  • select and reread favourite texts for enjoyment
  • participate in shared reading, posing and responding to questions and joining in the refrains
  • participate in guided reading situations, observing and applying reading behaviours and interacting effectively with the group
  • understand that print is permanent, for example, when listening to familiar stories, notices when the reader leaves out or changes parts
  • listen attentively and respond actively to read- aloud situations; make predictions, anticipate possible outcomes

Writing (Phase 2)

  • create illustrations to match their own written text
  • form letters/characters conventionally and legibly, with an understanding as to why this is important within a language community
  • enjoy writing and value their own efforts
  • listen attentively and respond actively to read- aloud situations; make predictions, anticipate possible outcomes
  • make connections between personal experience and storybook characters
  • read their own writing to the teacher and to classmates, realizing that what they have written remains unchanged
  • demonstrate an awareness of the conventions of written text, for example, sequence, spacing, directionality
  • write informally about their own ideas, experiences and feelings in a personal journal or diary, initially using simple sentence structures, for example, “I like …”, “I can …” , “I went to …”, “I am going to …”

PYP2 (Grade 2) Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students will be working on this year?

Human and Natural Environments

  • describe the natural features of local and other environments
  • identify factors that influence where people live and what their homes are like
  • present the type of home that reflects who he or she is.

Social Organization and Culture

  • describe and compare the various communities to which he or she belongs
  • explain how communities have natural and constructed features
  • recognize the components of a local community
  • identify the contributions of different members of a community
  • create and share his or her own story about being a community member.

Skills

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
  • Use and analyse evidence from a variety of historical, geographical and societal sources.
  • Orientate in relation to place and time.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.
  • Assess the accuracy, validity and possible bias of sources.

PYP2 (Grade 2) Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Phase 2)

  • read and write whole numbers up to hundreds or beyond
  • use the language of addition and subtraction, for example, add, take away, plus, minus, sum, difference
  • model addition and subtraction of whole numbers
  • use whole numbers up to hundreds or beyond in real-life situations
  • develop strategies for memorizing addition and subtraction number facts
  • estimate sums and differences
  • estimate quantities to 100 or beyond  
  • use fast recall of addition and subtraction number facts in real-life situation
  • model numbers to hundreds or beyond using the base 10 place value system
  • read, write, compare and order cardinal and ordinal numbers
  • use cardinal and ordinal numbers in real-life situations

Pattern and Function (Phase 2)

  • understand that patterns can be found in numbers, for example, odd and even numbers, skip counting
  • represent patterns in a variety of ways, for example, using words, drawings, symbols, materials, actions, numbers describe number patterns, for example, odd and even numbers, skip counting.
  • understand the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction
  • describe number patterns, for example, odd and even numbers, skip counting.
  • extend and create patterns in numbers, for example, odd and even numbers, skip counting
  • use the properties and relationships of addition and subtraction to solve problems.

Data Handling (Phase 2)

  • understand that sets can be organized by one or more attributes
  • understand the concept of chance in daily events (impossible, less likely, maybe, most likely, certain).
  • collect and represent data in different types of graphs, for example, tally marks, bar graphs
  • understand that information about themselves and their surroundings can be collected and recorded in different ways
  • collect and represent data in different types of graphs, for example, tally marks, bar graphs
  • represent the relationship between objects in sets using tree, Venn and Carroll diagrams
  • use tree, Venn and Carroll diagrams to explore relationships between data

Measurement (Phase 2)

  • read and write the time to the hour, half hour and quarter hour
  • estimate and compare lengths of time: second, minute, hour, day, week and month.
  • use measures of time to assist with problem solving in real-life situations. understand that tools can be used to measure
  • understand that calendars can be used to determine the date, and to identify and sequence days of the week and months of the year
  • estimate and measure objects using standard units of measurement: length, mass, capacity, money and temperature
  • understand the use of standard units to measure, for example, length, mass, money, time, temperature
  • understand that tools can be used to measure

Shape and Space (Phase 2)

  • understand that there are relationships among and between 2D and 3D shapes
  • understand that 2D and 3D shapes can be created by putting together and/or taking apart other shapes
  • sort, describe and label 2D and 3D shapes
  • analyse and describe the relationships between 2D and 3D shapes
  • identify lines of reflective symmetry
  • analyse and use what they know about 3D shapes to describe and work with 2D shapes

recognize and explain simple symmetrical designs in the environment.

PYP2 (Grade 2) Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Living Things

  • recognize that living things, including humans, need certain resources for energy and growth
  • identify the major food groups and be aware of the role they play in human development.
  • reflect on the impact of air on living things
  • identify the common components of life cycles (for example, birth, growth, maturity, reproduction, death)

Materials and Matter

  • investigate and identify the properties of air
  • apply his or her understanding about the properties of air (for example, building a windmill)
  • explore links between air, light and sound (for example, thunder and lightning).
  • investigate ways that familiar materials can be reused
  • group materials on the basis of properties for the purpose of recycling
  • describe how a particular material is recycled
  • explore the role of living things in recycling energy and matter.

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored.
  • Use a variety of instruments and tools to measure data accurately
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary.
  • Make and test predictions.
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions.

PYP2 (Grade 2) P.E.

Physical education in a PYP school is more than just student participation in sports and games. Its purpose should is:

  • to develop a combination of transferable skills promoting physical, intellectual, emotional and social development; 
  • to encourage present and future choices that contribute to long-term healthy living; 
  • to understand the cultural significance of physical activities for individuals and communities. 

The development of overall well-being is defined through three common strands that have relevance to all teachers: 

  • Identity
  • Active Living 
  • Interactions. 

These strands are concept driven and have been designed to interact with each other, working together to support the overall development of students. 

What will students will be working on this year?

Active Living (Phase 2)

  • Recognize the importance of regular exercise in the development of well-being
  • Identify healthy food choices
  • Reflect on the interaction between body systems during exercise
  • Communicate their understanding of the need for good hygiene practices

Interactions (Phase 2)

  • Value interacting, playing and learning with others.
  • Cooperate with others
  • Seek adult support in situations of conflict
  • Ask questions and express wonderings
  • Celebrate the accomplishment of the group
  • Understand the impact of their actions on each other and the environment.

Identity (Phase 2)

  • Describe similarities and differences between themselves and others through the exploration of cultures, appearance, gender, ethnicity, and personal preferences
  • Explain how different experiences can result in different emotions
  • Recognize others’ perspectives and accommodate these to shape a broader view of the world
  • Become aware of their emotions and begin to regulate their emotional responses and behaviour.

PYP2 Grade 2 Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students will be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 2)

  • express their responses to music from different cultures and styles
  • recognize music from a basic range of cultures and styles
  • explore individually or collectively a musical response to a narrated story
  • sing individually and in unison
  • share performances with each other and give constructive criticism.

Music – Creating (Phase 2)

  • express one or more moods/feelings in a musical composition
  • create music to represent different cultures and styles
  • explore vocal sounds, rhythms, instruments, timbres to communicate ideas and feelings
  • read, write and perform simple musical patterns and phrases

Dance (responding) Phase 2

  • identify dance components such as rhythm and use of space in their own and others’ dance creations
  • discuss and explain the way ideas, feelings and experiences can be communicated through stories and performance

Dance (Creating) Phase 2

  • interpret and communicate feeling, experience and narrative through dance
  • design a dance phrase with a beginning, middle and ending
  • share dance with different audiences by participating, listening and watching
  • work cooperatively towards a common goal, taking an active part in a creative experience
  • use performance as a problem-solving tool
  • value and develop imaginary roles or situations.

PYP3 ( Grade 3 )

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

PYP3 (Grade 3) English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students will be working on this year?

Listening and speaking (Phase 3)

  • use language to explain, inquire and compare
  • begin to understand that language use is influenced by its purpose and the audience
  • understand and use specific vocabulary to suit different purposes
  • listen attentively and speak appropriately in small and large group interactions
  • express thoughts, ideas and opinions and discuss them, respecting contributions from others
  • hear and appreciate differences between languages.
  • listen to a variety of oral presentations including stories, poems, rhymes and reports and respond with increasing confidence and detail
  • participate in a variety of dramatic activities, for example, role play, puppet theatre, dramatization of familiar stories and poems

Viewing and presenting (Phase 3)

  • view visual information and show understanding by asking relevant questions and discussing possible meaning
  • realize that visual information reflects and contributes to the understanding of context
  • recognize and name familiar visual texts, for example, advertising, logos, labels, signs, ICT iconography
  • observe and discuss familiar and unfamiliar visual messages; make judgments about effectiveness
  • discuss personal experiences that connect with visual images
  • use actions and body language to reinforce and add meaning to oral presentations
  • select and use suitable shapes, colours, symbols and layout for presentations; practise and develop writing/calligraphy styles
  • realize that text and illustrations in reference materials work together to convey information, and can explain how this enhances understanding
  • with guidance, use the internet to access relevant information; process and present information in ways that are personally meaningful
  • use appropriate terminology to discuss visual texts, for example, logos, font, foreground, background, impact
  • view a range of visual language formats and discuss their effectiveness, for example, film/video, posters, drama
  • realize that effects have been selected and arranged to achieve a certain impact, for example, the way in which colour, lighting, music and movement work together in a performance
  • observe and discuss visual presentations; make suggestions about why they have been created and what the creator has been aiming to achieve.

Reading (Phase 3)

  • develop personal preferences, selecting books for pleasure and information
  • read texts at an appropriate level, independently, confidently and with good understanding
  • recognize a range of different text types, for example, letters, poetry, plays, stories, novels, reports, articles
  • identify and explain the basic structure of a story—beginning, middle and end; may use storyboards or comic strips to communicate elements
  • make predictions about a story, based on their own knowledge and experience; revise or confirm predictions as the story progresses
  • realize that there is a difference between fiction and non-fiction and use books for particular purposes, with teacher guidance
  • recognize and use the different parts of a book, for example, title page, contents, index
  • Read multisyllable words using letters and their phonemes
  • Use a range of strategies to self- monitor and self-correct, for example, meaning, context, rereading, reading on, cross- checking one cue source against another
  • discuss personality and behaviour of storybook characters, commenting on reasons why they might react in particular ways
  • discuss their own experiences and relate them to fiction and non- fiction texts
  • participate in collaborative learning experiences, acknowledging that people see things differently and are entitled to express their point of view
  • wonder about texts and ask questions to try to understand what the author is saying to the reader.

Writing (Phase 3)

  • use feedback from teachers and other students to improve their writing
  • use a dictionary, a thesaurus and word banks to extend their use of language
  • keep a log of ideas to write about
  • use graphic organizers to plan writing, for example, Mind Maps, storyboards
  • use familiar aspects of written language with increasing confidence and accuracy, for example, spelling patterns, high frequency words, high- interest words
  • write legibly, and in a consistent style
  • over time, create examples of different types of writing and store them in their own writing folder
  • participate in teacher conferences with teachers recording progress and noting new learning goals; self-monitor and take responsibility for improvement
  • with teacher guidance, publish written work, in handwritten form or in digital format.
  • engage confidently with the process of writing • write about a range of topics for a variety of purposes, using literary forms and structures modelled by the teacher and/or encountered in reading
  • organize ideas in a logical sequence, for example, write simple narratives with a beginning, middle and end
  • use appropriate writing conventions, for example, word order, as required by the language(s) of instruction
  • use increasingly accurate grammatical constructs
  • proofread their own writing and make some corrections and improvements

PYP3 Grade 3 Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students will be working on this year?

Social organization and culture (Age 7-9)

  • explore how families influence the individual
  • describe how artefacts, heirlooms and rituals are evidence of cultural identity
  • compare and contrast current family experiences with those of a previous generation.
  • identify the cultural and historical context in which signs and symbols develop

Resources and the Environment (Age 7-9)

  • explain people’s responsibilities regarding the use of resources from the environment.
  • describe the relationships between the location of water and population distribution

Skills

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
  • Use and analyse evidence from a variety of historical, geographical and societal sources.
  • Orientate in relation to place and time.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.
  • Assess the accuracy, validity and possible bias of sources.

PYP3 (Grade 3) Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 5 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Securing phase 2 and starting phase 3)

  • model numbers to hundreds or beyond using the base 10 place value system
  • estimate quantities to 100 or beyond
  • use the language of addition and subtraction, for example, add, take away, plus, minus, sum, difference
  • model addition and subtraction of whole numbers
  • develop strategies for memorizing addition and subtraction number facts
  • estimate sums and differences
  • read and write whole numbers up to hundreds or beyond
  • describe mental and written strategies for adding and subtracting two-digit numbers.
  • use whole numbers up to hundreds or beyond in real-life situations
  • use fast recall of addition and subtraction number facts in real-life situations
  • use mental and written strategies for addition and subtraction of two- digit numbers or beyond in real-life situations

Pattern and Function ((Securing phase 2 and starting phase 3)

  • understand that patterns can be analysed and rules identified
  • understand that multiplication is repeated addition and that division is repeated subtraction
  • understand the inverse relationship between multiplication and division
  • describe the rule for a pattern in a variety of ways
  • represent rules for patterns using words, symbols and tables
  • use number patterns to make predictions and solve problems

Data Handling (Securing phase 2 and starting phase 3)

  • Select appropriate graph form(s) to display data
  • Understand that scale can represent different quantities in graphs
  • Collect, display and interpret data using simple graphs, for example, bar graphs, line graphs
  • Design a survey and systematically collect, organize and display data in pictographs and bar graphs
  • Select appropriate graph form(s) to display data
  • Understand that data can be collected, displayed and interpreted using simple graphs, for example, bar graphs, line graphs
  • Understand that one of the purposes of a database is to answer questions and solve problems
  • Identify, read and interpret range and scale on graphs

Measurement (Securing phase 2 and starting phase 3)

  • use standard units of measurement to solve problems in real-life situations involving length, mass, capacity, money and temperature
  • understand the use of standard units to measure, for example, length, mass, money, time, temperature
  • understand that tools can be used to measure
  • understand that time is measured using universal units of measure, for example, years, months, days, hours, minutes and seconds
  • read and write digital and analogue time on 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.
  • use timelines in units of inquiry and other real-life situations.

Shape and Space (Securing phase 2 and starting phase 3)

  • Understand the properties of regular and irregular polygons
  • Understand congruent or similar shapes
  • Sort, describe and model regular and irregular polygons
  • Describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes analyse and describe 2D and 3D shapes, including regular and irregular polygons, using geometrical vocabulary
  • Identify, describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes.

PYP3 (Grade 3) Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Earth and space (Age 7-9)

  • describe how water sustains life
  • analyse systems of water storage and usage, both natural and human-made
  • explain why fresh water is a limited resource
  • identify water issues and propose solutions for responsible, equitable water use (for example, desalination).

Materials and matter (Age 7-9)

  • investigate how buildings and other structures stand up (for example, piles, buttresses, I-beam girders)
  • investigate the construction of a building or structure and identify the materials used
  • critique the impact of a structure on the natural environment
  • explain people’s responsibility regarding the use of materials from the environment.

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored.
  • Use a variety of instruments and tools to measure data accurately
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary.
  • Make and test predictions.

Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions.

PYP3 (Grade 3) PE

Physical education in a PYP school is more than just student participation in sports and games. Its purpose should is:

  • to develop a combination of transferable skills promoting physical, intellectual, emotional and social development; 
  • to encourage present and future choices that contribute to long-term healthy living; 
  • to understand the cultural significance of physical activities for individuals and communities. 

The development of overall well-being is defined through three common strands that have relevance to all teachers: 

  • Identity
  • Active Living 
  • Interactions. 

These strands are concept driven and have been designed to interact with each other, working together to support the overall development of students. 

What will students will be working on this year?

Active Living (Phase 2)

  • Recognize the importance of regular exercise in the development of well-being
  • Identify healthy food choices
  • Reflect on the interaction between body systems during exercise
  • Communicate their understanding of the need for good hygiene practices

Interactions (Phase 2)

  • identify ways to live a healthier lifestyle
  • understand that there are substances that can cause harm to health
  • demonstrate an understanding of the principles of training in developing and maintaining fitness
  • demonstrate greater body control when performing movements

Identity (Phase 2)

  • describe similarities and differences between themselves and others through the exploration of cultures, appearance, gender, ethnicity, and personal preferences
  • express hopes, goals and aspirations
  • recognize others’ perspectives and accommodate these to shape a broader view of the world
  • reflect on inner thoughts and self-talk

PYP3 (Grade 3) Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students will be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 3)

  • express their responses to music from different cultures and styles
  • sing individually and in unison
  • recognize music from a basic range of cultures and styles
  • explore individually or collectively a musical response to a narrated story
  • reflect on and communicate their reactions to music using musical vocabulary

Music – Creating (Phase 3)

  • express one or more moods/feelings in a musical composition
  • create music to represent different cultures and styles
  • create a soundscape based on personal experiences
  • collaboratively create a musical sequence using known musical elements (for example, rhythm, melody, contrast)

Visual Arts – Responding (Phase 3)

  • compare, contrast and categorize artworks from a range of cultures, places and times
  • provide constructive criticism when responding to artwork.
  • recognize that different audiences respond in different ways to artworks

Visual Arts – Creating (Phase 3)

  • create artwork for a specific audience

use a range of strategies to solve problems during the creative process.

PYP4 ( Grade 4 )

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

PYP4 (Grade 4) English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students will be working on this year?

Listening and speaking (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • verbalize their thinking and explain their reasoning
  • listen appreciatively and responsively, presenting their own point of view and respecting the views of others
  • listen for a specific purpose in a variety of situations
  • understand that ideas and opinions can be generated, developed and presented through talk; they work in pairs and groups to develop oral presentations
  • argue persuasively and defend a point of view
  • organize thoughts and feelings before speaking
  • appreciate that language is not always used literally; understand and use the figurative language of their own culture.
  • understand that ideas and opinions can be generated, developed and presented through talk; they work in pairs and groups to develop oral presentations
  • explain and discuss their own writing with peers and adults
  • begin to paraphrase and summarize
  • use a range of specific vocabulary in different situations, indicating an awareness that language is influenced by purpose, audience and context
  • realize that grammatical structures can be irregular and begin to use them appropriately and consistently

Viewing and presenting (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • with guidance, use the internet to access relevant information; process and present information in ways that are personally meaningful
  • observe and discuss visual presentations; make suggestions about why they have been created and what the creator has been aiming to achieve.
  • realize that visual information reflects and contributes to the understanding of context
  • discuss personal experiences that connect with visual images
  • realize that visual presentations have been created to reach out to a particular audience and influence the audience in some way; discuss the effects used and how they might influence the audience.
  • describe personal reactions to visual messages; reflect on why others may perceive the images differently
  • recognize and name familiar visual texts and explain why they are or are not effective, for example, advertising, logos, labels, signs, billboards
  • design posters and charts, using shapes, colours, symbols, layout and fonts, to achieve particular effects; explain how the desired effect is achieved
  • prepare, individually or in collaboration, visual presentations using a range of media, including computer and web-based applications
  • discuss and explain visual images and effects using appropriate terminology, for example, image, symbol, graphics, balance, techniques, composition

Reading (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • read a variety of books for pleasure, instruction and information; reflect regularly on reading and set future goals
  • distinguish between fiction and non-fiction and select books appropriate to specific purposes
  • recognize the author’s purpose, for example, to inform, entertain, persuade, instruct
  • use reference books, dictionaries, and computer and web-based applications with increasing independence and responsibility
  • access information from a variety of texts both in print and online, for example, newspapers, magazines, journals, comics, graphic books, e-books, blogs, wikis
  • know when and how to use the internet and multimedia resources for research
  • understand that the internet must be used with the approval and supervision of a parent or teacher;
  • use reference books, dictionaries, and computer and web-based applications with increasing independence and responsibility
  • know how to skim and scan texts to decide whether they will be useful, before attempting to read in detail
  • as part of the inquiry process, work cooperatively with others to access, read, interpret, and evaluate a range of source materials
  • identify relevant, reliable and useful information and decide on appropriate ways to use it

Writing (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • organize ideas in a logical sequence
  • reread, edit and revise to improve their own writing, for example, content, language, organization
  • respond to the writing of others sensitively
  • use appropriate punctuation to support meaning
  • check punctuation, variety of sentence starters, spelling, presentation
  • use a dictionary and thesaurus to check accuracy, broaden vocabulary and enrich their writing
  • work cooperatively with a partner to discuss and improve each other’s work, taking the roles of authors and editors
  • write for a range of purposes, both creative and informative, using different types of structures and styles according to the purpose of the writing
  • work independently, to produce written work that is legible and well-presented, written either by hand or in digital format.
  • use a range of strategies to record words/ideas of increasing complexity
  • work independently, to produce written work that is legible and well-presented, written either by hand or in digital format.
  • Use increasingly accurate grammatical constructs

PYP4 (Grade 4) Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students will be working on this year?

Social organization and culture (Age 7-9)

  • Explore how families influence the individual
  • Compare and contrast current family experiences with those of a previous generation.
  • Describe the impact of communications technology on everyday communication

Resources and the Environment (Age 7-9)

  • Compare the design of structures in various locations in relation to the natural environment
  • Identify geographical and environmental factors that influence the design of structures in various locations
  • Critique the impact of a structure on the natural environment

Continuity and Change Through Time (Age 7-9) 

  • Locate on a globe or map his or her place in the world, and its relationship to various other places
  • Use a variety of resources and tools to gather and process information about various regions and different ways of representing the world
  • Explain how people’s perceptions and representations of place have changed over time
  • Represent people, events and places chronologically
  • Compare and contrast current family experiences with those of a previous generation
  • Explore scientific and technological developments that help people understand and respond to the changing Earth

Human Systems and Economic Activities (Age 7-9)

  • Identify responsibilities people have in different workplaces
  • Construct visual representations (for example, graphs, charts, diagrams, timelines, pictorial maps) to clarify relationships within a workplace
  • Work in a group to establish a shared vision and purpose for the class.
  • Identify the services and the users of these services in the local community
  • Gather data (for example, survey) in order to identify current and future needs to support the community
  • Apply his or her knowledge to plan services for the local community.

Skills

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
  • Use and analyse evidence from a variety of historical, geographical and societal sources.
  • Orientate in relation to place and time.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.
  • Assess the accuracy, validity and possible bias of sources.

PYP4 (Grade 4) Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Phase 3)

  • model numbers to hundreds or beyond using the base 10 place value system
  • estimate quantities to 100 or beyond
  • use the language of addition and subtraction, for example, add, take away, plus, minus, sum, difference
  • model addition and subtraction of whole numbers
  • develop strategies for memorizing addition and subtraction number facts
  • estimate sums and differences
  • read and write whole numbers up to hundreds or beyond
  • describe mental and written strategies for adding and subtracting two-digit numbers.
  • use whole numbers up to hundreds or beyond in real-life situations
  • use fast recall of addition and subtraction number facts in real-life situations
  • use mental and written strategies for addition and subtraction of two- digit numbers or beyond in real-life situations

Pattern and Function (Phase 3)

  • understand that patterns can be analysed and rules identified
  • understand that multiplication is repeated addition and that division is repeated subtraction
  • understand the inverse relationship between multiplication and division
  • describe the rule for a pattern in a variety of ways
  • represent rules for patterns using words, symbols and tables
  • use number patterns to make predictions and solve problems

Data Handling (Phase 3)

  • Select appropriate graph form(s) to display data
  • Understand that scale can represent different quantities in graphs
  • Collect, display and interpret data using simple graphs, for example, bar graphs, line graphs
  • Design a survey and systematically collect, organize and display data in pictographs and bar graphs
  • Select appropriate graph form(s) to display data
  • Understand that data can be collected, displayed and interpreted using simple graphs, for example, bar graphs, line graphs
  • Understand that one of the purposes of a database is to answer questions and solve problems
  • Identify, read and interpret range and scale on graphs

Measurement (Phase 3)

  • use standard units of measurement to solve problems in real-life situations involving length, mass, capacity, money and temperature
  • understand the use of standard units to measure, for example, length, mass, money, time, temperature
  • understand that tools can be used to measure
  • understand that time is measured using universal units of measure, for example, years, months, days, hours, minutes and seconds
  • read and write digital and analogue time on 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.
  • use timelines in units of inquiry and other real-life situations.

Shape and Space (Phase 3)

  • Understand the common language used to describe shapes
  • Understand the properties of regular and irregular polygons
  • Sort, describe and model regular and irregular polygons
  • Describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes analyse and describe 2D and 3D shapes, including regular and irregular polygons, using geometrical vocabulary
  • Identify, describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes
  • Understand that lines and axes of reflective and rotational symmetry assist with the construction of shapes
  • Understand an angle as a measure of rotation
  • Understand that visualization of shape and space is a strategy for solving problems.
  • Sort, describe and model regular and irregular polygons
  • Analyse angles by comparing and describing rotations: whole turn; half turn; quarter turn; north, south, east and west on a compass

PYP4 (Grade 4) Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Earth and space (Age 7-9)

  • Describe how natural phenomena shape the planet
  • Identify the evidence that the Earth has changed (for example, land formations in local environment)
  • Reflect on the explanations from a range of sources as to why the Earth changes.

Materials and matter (Age 7-9)

  • investigate how buildings and other structures stand up (for example, piles, buttresses, I-beam girders)
  • investigate the construction of a building or structure and identify the materials used
  • critique the impact of a structure on the natural environment
  • explain people’s responsibility regarding the use of materials from the environment.

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored.
  • Use a variety of instruments and tools to measure data accurately
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary.
  • Make and test predictions.
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions.

PYP4 (Grade 4) PE

Physical education in a PYP school is more than just student participation in sports and games. Its purpose should is:

  • to develop a combination of transferable skills promoting physical, intellectual, emotional and social development; 
  • to encourage present and future choices that contribute to long-term healthy living; 
  • to understand the cultural significance of physical activities for individuals and communities. 

The development of overall well-being is defined through three common strands that have relevance to all teachers: 

  • Identity
  • Active Living 
  • Interactions. 

These strands are concept driven and have been designed to interact with each other, working together to support the overall development of students. 

What will students will be working on this year?

Active Living (Phase 3)

  • develop plans to improve performance through technique refinement and practice
  • demonstrate greater body control when performing movements
  • self-assess performance and respond to feedback on performance from others
  • plan, perform and reflect on movement sequences in order to improve
  • identify potential personal and group outcomes for risk-taking behaviours.

Interactions (Phase 3)

  • reflect on shared and collaborative performance.
  • recognize that committing to shared goals in group situations improves individual and shared experiences and outcomes
  • identify individual strengths that can contribute to shared goals
  • develop a shared plan of action for group work that incorporates each individual’s experiences and strengths
  • adopt a variety of roles for the needs of the group, for example, leader, presenter
  • discuss ideas and ask questions to clarify meaning
  • reflect on the perspectives and ideas of others
  • apply different strategies when attempting to resolve conflict

Identity (Phase 3)

  • analyse how they are connected to the wider community
  • reflect on their own cultural influences, experiences, traditions and perspectives, and are open to those of others
  • motivate themselves intrinsically and behave with belief in themselves
  • explain how a person’s identity is made up of many different things, including membership in different cultures, and that this can change over time
  • recognize personal qualities, strengths and limitations

PYP4 Grade 4 Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students will be working on this year?

Music – Creating (Phase 3)

  • sing with accuracy and control focusing awareness on the musical elements
  • sing partner songs
  • discuss music that relates to social issues and/or values
  • share and compare their experiences as audience members at various performances
  • compare aspects of music from different times and places

Music – Creating (Phase 3)

  • deliver a musical message to different audiences (for example, peace message to parents, kindergarten children, friends)
  • improvise upon a basic pattern to reinforce the importance of the individual within the group
  • express themselves as individuals through musical composition

Visual Arts – Responding (Phase 3)

  • compare, contrast and categorize artworks from a range of cultures, places and times
  • provide constructive criticism when responding to artwork.
  • recognize that different audiences respond in different ways to artworks

Visual Arts – Creating (Phase 3)

  • create artwork for a specific audience
  • use a range of strategies to solve problems during the creative process.

PYP5 ( Grade 5 )

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

PYP 5 (Grade 5) English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students be working on this year?

Listening and speaking (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • verbalize their thinking and explain their reasoning
  • listen appreciatively and responsively, presenting their own point of view and respecting the views of others
  • listen for a specific purpose in a variety of situations
  • understand that ideas and opinions can be generated, developed and presented through talk; they work in pairs and groups to develop oral presentations
  • argue persuasively and defend a point of view
  • organize thoughts and feelings before speaking
  • appreciate that language is not always used literally; understand and use the figurative language of their own culture.
  • understand that ideas and opinions can be generated, developed and presented through talk; they work in pairs and groups to develop oral presentations
  • explain and discuss their own writing with peers and adults
  • begin to paraphrase and summarize
  • use a range of specific vocabulary in different situations, indicating an awareness that language is influenced by purpose, audience and context
  • realize that grammatical structures can be irregular and begin to use them appropriately and consistently

Viewing and presenting (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • view, respond to and describe visual information, communicating understanding in oral, written and visual form
  • describe personal reactions to visual messages; reflect on why others may perceive the images differently
  • understand and explain how visual effects can be used to reflect a particular context
  • recognize and name familiar visual texts and explain why they are or are not effective, for example, advertising, logos, labels, signs, billboards
  • interpret visual cues in order to analyse and make inferences about the intention of the message
  • explain how relevant personal experiences can add to the meaning of a selected film/movie; write and illustrate a personal response
  • identify aspects of body language in a dramatic presentation and explain how they are used to convey the mood and personal traits of characters
  • design posters and charts, using shapes, colours, symbols, layout and fonts, to achieve particular effects; explain how the desired effect is achieved
  • discuss a newspaper report and tell how the words and pictures work together to convey a particular message
  • prepare, individually or in collaboration, visual presentations using a range of media, including computer and web-based applications
  • discuss and explain visual images and effects using appropriate terminology, for example, image, symbol, graphics, balance, techniques, composition
  • experience a range of different visual language formats; appreciate and describe why particular formats are selected to achieve particular effects
  • observe and discuss the choice and composition of visual presentations and explain how they contribute to meaning and impact, for example, facial expressions, speech bubbles, word images to convey sound effects
  • realize that visual presentations have been created to reach out to a particular audience and influence the audience in some way; discuss the effects used and how they might influence the audience.                                                                                          

Reading (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • read a variety of books for pleasure, instruction and information; reflect regularly on reading and set future goals
  • distinguish between fiction and non-fiction and select books appropriate to specific purposes
  • understand and respond to the ideas, feelings and attitudes expressed in various texts, showing empathy for characters
  • recognize the author’s purpose, for example, to inform, entertain, persuade, instruct
  • understand that stories have a plot; identify the main idea; discuss and outline the sequence of events leading to the final outcome
  • appreciate that writers plan and structure their stories to achieve particular effects; identify features that can be replicated when planning their own
  • use reference books, dictionaries, and computer and web-based applications with increasing independence and responsibility
  • know how to skim and scan texts to decide whether they will be useful, before attempting to read in detail
  • As part of the inquiry process, work cooperatively with others to access, read, interpret, and evaluate a range of source materials
  • identify relevant, reliable and useful information and decide on appropriate ways to use it
  • access information from a variety of texts both in print and online, for example, newspapers, magazines, journals, comics, graphic books, e- books, blogs, wikis
  • know when and how to use the internet and multimedia resources for research
  • understand that the internet must be used with the approval and supervision of a parent or teacher.

Writing (Securing phase 3 and starting phase 4)

  • write independently and with confidence, demonstrating a personal voice as a writer
  • write for a range of purposes, both creative and informative, using different types of structures and styles according to the purpose of the writing
  • show awareness of different audiences and adapt writing appropriately
  • select vocabulary and supporting details to achieve desired effects e.g. adjectives and powerful verbs
  • organize ideas in a logical sequence
  • reread, edit and revise to improve their own writing, for example, content, language, organization respond to the writing of others sensitively
  • Begin to take notes and summarise research using own words. (Paraphrasing).
  • use appropriate punctuation with increasing accuracy. E.g. full stop, capital letter, comma, question mark, exclamation mark, speech marks and apostrophes for contraction and possession.
  • use accurately writing conventions: parts of speech (nouns –singular and plural, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, articles, prepositions) and use in the sentences.
  • Identify the use of powerful verbs and descriptive language E.g adjectives, adverbs, similes and metaphors in narrative writing and poetry.
  • use verb tenses with increasing accuracy in writing e.g present, past and future tenses.
  • Use commas to mark off grammatical boundaries within a sentence
  • Group sentences about similar information together to form a paragraph.
  • Write more complex sentences using conjunctions and time connectives.
  • Identify word order in positive and negative statements and questions
  • Explore and use in writing letter patterns, e.g. prefixes, suffixes, compound words, contractions etc.
  • use a range of strategies to record words/ideas of increasing complexity
  • realize that writers ask questions of themselves and identify ways to improve their writing, for example, “Is this what I meant to say?”, “Is it interesting/relevant?”
  • check punctuation, variety of sentence starters, spelling, presentation
  • use a dictionary and thesaurus to check accuracy, broaden vocabulary and enrich their writing
  • work cooperatively with a partner to discuss and improve each other’s work, taking the roles of authors and editors.
  • work independently, to produce written work that is legible and well- presented, written either by hand or in digital format.

PYP5 (Grade 5) Social Studies

Social Studies

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

What will students be working on this year?

Social organization and culture (Age 9-12)

  • Reflect upon how beliefs affect the individual and society.
  • Explore issues relating to children’s rights, roles and responsibilities in relation to his or her own and other cultures.
  • Identify and describe ways that family, groups and community influence personal choices.
  • Explore how cultures may have certain expectations of how to act and dress, and the ways this may differ according to private and public contexts.

Resources and the Environment (Age 9-12)

  • Compare the design of structures in various locations in relation to the natural environment
  • Identify geographical and environmental factors that influence the design of structures in various locations
  • Critique the impact of a structure on the natural environment
  • Explain how human activities can have positive or adverse effects on local and other environments (for example, agriculture, industry).

Continuity and Change Through Time (Age 9-12)

  • analyse information about past technological advances and societal systems
  • assess which aspects of past civilizations have had the most impact on the present day, using evidence from a variety of sources
  • predict societal and technological changes in the future.
  • identify and describe examples in which technology has changed the lives of people
  • describe the connection between human needs and wants and technological development
  • explain the relevance of various inventions in relation to the time period in which they were developed
  • reflect on the role of technology in his or her own life.

Skills

  • Formulate and ask questions about the past, the future, places and society.
  • Use and analyse evidence from a variety of historical, geographical and societal sources.
  • Orientate in relation to place and time.
  • Identify roles, rights and responsibilities in society.
  • Assess the accuracy, validity and possible bias of sources.

PYP5 (Grade 5) Mathematics

Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students be working on this year?

Number (Phase 3)

  • model numbers to thousands or beyond using the base 10 place value system
  • model multiplication and division of whole numbers
  • read, write, compare and order whole numbers up to thousands or beyond
  • develop strategies for memorizing addition, subtraction, multiplication and division number facts
  • use whole numbers up to thousands or beyond in real-life situations
  • use fast recall of multiplication and division number facts in real-life situations
  • model equivalent fractions
  • use the language of fractions, for example, numerator, denominator
  • model decimal fractions to hundredths or beyond
  • model addition and subtraction of fractions with related denominators
  • model addition and subtraction of decimals.
  • read, write, compare and order fractions
  • read and write equivalent fractions
  • read, write, compare and order fractions to hundredths or beyond
  • use decimal fractions in real-life situations
  • add and subtract fractions with related denominators in real-life situations

Pattern and Function (Phase 3)

  • understand that patterns can be analysed and rules identified
  • understand that multiplication is repeated addition and that division is repeated subtraction
  • understand the inverse relationship between multiplication and division
  • understand the associative and commutative properties of multiplication.
  • describe the rule for a pattern in a variety of ways
  • represent rules for patterns using words, symbols and tables
  • identify a sequence of operations relating one set of numbers to another set.
  • select appropriate methods for representing patterns, for example using words, symbols and tables
  • use number patterns to make predictions and solve problems
  • use the properties and relationships of the four operations to solve problems.

Data Handling (Phase 3)

  • design a survey and systematically collect, organize and display data in pictographs and bar graphs
  • select appropriate graph form(s) to display data
  • interpret range and scale on graphs
  • express probability using simple fractions.
  • understand that data can be collected, displayed and interpreted using simple graphs, for example, bar graphs, line graphs
  • understand that scale can represent different quantities in graphs
  • understand that the mode can be used to summarize a set of data
  • understand that one of the purposes of a database is to answer questions and solve problems
  • collect, display and interpret data using simple graphs, for example, bar graphs, line graphs
  • identify, read and interpret range and scale on graphs
  • identify the mode of a set of data

Measurement (Phase 3)

  • develop and describe formulas for finding perimeter, area and volume
  • use decimal and fraction notation in measurement, for example, 3.2 cm, 1.47 kg, 11.32 miles
  • read and interpret scales on a range of measuring instruments
  • carry out simple unit conversions within a system of measurement (metric or customary).
  • select and use appropriate units of measurement and tools to solve problems in real-life situations
  • determine and justify the level of accuracy required to solve real-life problems involving measurement
  • use decimal and fractional notation in measurement, for example, 3.2 cm, 1.47 kg, 11.32 miles
  • understand procedures for finding area, perimeter and volume

Shape and Space (Phase 3)

  • understand the common language used to describe shapes
  • understand the properties of regular and irregular polygons
  • understand congruent or similar shapes
  • understand that lines and axes of reflective and rotational symmetry assist with the construction of shapes
  • understand an angle as a measure of rotation
  • understand that directions for location can be represented by coordinates on a grid
  • understand that visualization of shape and space is a strategy for solving problems.
  • sort, describe and model regular and irregular polygons
  • describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes
  • analyse angles by comparing and describing rotations: whole turn; half turn; quarter turn; north, south, east and west on a compass
  • locate features on a grid using coordinates
  • describe and/or represent mental images of objects, patterns, and paths.
  • analyse and describe 2D and 3D shapes, including regular and irregular polygons, using geometrical vocabulary
  • identify, describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes
  • recognize and explain symmetrical patterns, including tessellation, in the environment
  • apply knowledge of transformations to problem-solving situations.

PYP5 (Grade 5) Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students be working on this year?

Living Things (9-12)

  • Describe the interactions of living things within and between ecosystems
  • Examine interactions between living things and non-living parts of the environment
  • Recognize that solar energy sustains ecosystems through a transformation of energy
  • Investigate the conservation of energy in ecosystems
  • Analyse the effects of changing a link in a food web
  • Explain how human activities can have positive or adverse effects on local and other environments (for example, waste disposal, agriculture, industry).
  • Recognize that plants and animals go through predictable life cycles

Earth and Space (9-12)

  • investigate technology developments
  • examine the impact of particular technologies on sustainability
  • suggest areas for future technological advances.

Materials and Matter (9-12)

  • assess the benefits and challenges of changing materials to suit people’s needs and wants (for example, plastic)
  • recognize and report on the environmental impact of some manufacturing processes.

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data.
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored.
  • Use a variety of instruments and tools to measure data accurately
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary.
  • Make and test predictions.
  • Consider scientific models and applications of these models (including their limitations).
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions.

PYP5 (Grade 5) P.E.

Physical education in a PYP school is more than just student participation in sports and games. Its purpose should is:

  • to develop a combination of transferable skills promoting physical, intellectual, emotional and social development; 
  • to encourage present and future choices that contribute to long-term healthy living; 
  • to understand the cultural significance of physical activities for individuals and communities. 

The development of overall well-being is defined through three common strands that have relevance to all teachers: 

  • Identity
  • Active Living 
  • Interactions. 

These strands are concept driven and have been designed to interact with each other, working together to support the overall development of students. 

What will students be working on this year?

Active Living (Phase 4)

  • identify realistic goals and strategies to improve personal fitness
  • exhibit effective decision-making processes in the application of skills during physical activity
  • introduce greater complexity and refine movements to improve the quality of a movement sequence

Interactions (Phase 4)

  • reflect critically on the effectiveness of the group during and at the end of the process
  • build on previous experiences to improve group performance
  • independently use different strategies to resolve conflict
  • work towards a consensus, understanding the need to negotiate and compromise
  • take action to support reparation in relationships and in the environment when harm has been done.

Identity (Phase 4)

  • analyse how society can influence our concept of self-worth (for example, through the media and advertising)
  • identify how aspects of a person’s identity can be expressed through symbols, spirituality, dress, adornment, personal attitudes, lifestyle, interests and activities pursued
  • analyse how assumptions can lead to misconceptions
  • recognize, analyse and apply different strategies to cope with adversity
  • accept and appreciate the diversity of cultures, experiences and perspectives of others.

PYP5 (Grade 5) Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 4)

  • explain the role and relevance of music in their own culture, its uses and associations through place and time
  • explore different artistic presentations that are/ were innovative and their implications.
  • sing individually and in harmony

Music – Creating (Phase 4)

  • incorporate the other arts and available resources in order to broaden their creative expression
  • read and write music in traditional and/or non- traditional notation.
  • present, in small groups, innovative musical performances on a selected issue

Visual Arts – Responding (Phase 4)

  • reflect throughout the creative process to challenge their thinking and enact new and unusual possibilities
  • critique and make informed judgments about artworks.

Creating (Phase 4)

  • become increasingly independent in the realization of the creative process
  • adjust and refine their creative process in response to constructive criticism
  • identify factors to be considered when displaying an artwork
  • utilize a broad range of ways to make meaning
  • select, research and develop an idea or theme for an artwork.

 PYP6 ( Grade 6 )

The Primary Years Programme (PYP) presents schools with a comprehensive plan for high quality, international education.

It provides schools with a curriculum framework of essential elements — the knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action that young students need to equip them for successful lives, both now and in the future.

Schools work with the five elements to construct a rigorous and challenging primary curriculum for international education.

The PYP aims to create a curriculum that is engaging, relevant, challenging and significant for learners in the 3–12 age range. The curriculum is transdisciplinary, meaning that it focuses on issues that go across subject areas.

Click the box below to access more information for this grade level. 

Subject Specific Outcomes

PYP 6 (Grade 6) English Language

English is our shared language of instruction and communication. In a PYP school the focus is not just on learning language in isolation, but also on the application of language skills across the subject areas and throughout the Programme of Inquiry. Some language is taught as ‘stand-alone’, while other aspects of language are taught in the context of our Units of Inquiry. We believe students learn best when they have opportunities to learn within meaningful contexts, and when the teaching is in response to students’ needs, interests and previous experiences. Students at OurPlanet come from a wide range of language and cultural backgrounds, which we view as a major asset to our learning community.

Students develop skills in the following strands of language learning:

  • Oral Language: Listening and Speaking
  • Visual Language: Viewing and Presenting
  • Written Language: Reading and Writing

What will students be working on this year?

Listening and speaking (Phase 5)

  • participate appropriately as listener and speaker, in discussions, conversations, debates and group presentations
  • generate, develop and modify ideas and opinions through discussion
  • listen and respond appropriately to instructions, questions and explanations
  • infer meanings, draw conclusions and make judgments about oral presentations
  • use an increasing vocabulary and more complex sentence structures with a high level of specificity
  • argue persuasively and justify a point of view
  • show open-minded attitudes when listening to other points of view
  • paraphrase and summarize when communicating orally
  • understand and use figurative language such as simile, personification and metaphor
  • use oral language to formulate and communicate possibilities and theories
  • use standard grammatical structures competently in appropriate situations
  • use register, tone, voice level and intonation to enhance meaning
  • appreciate that people speak and respond according to personal and cultural perspectives
  • use speech responsibly to inform, entertain and influence others
  • reflect on communication to monitor and assess their own learning.

Viewing and presenting (Phase 5)

  • view and critically analyse a range of visual texts, communicating understanding through oral, written and visual media
  • identify factors that influence personal reactions to visual texts; design visual texts with the intention of influencing the way people think and feel
  • analyse and interpret the ways in which visual effects are used to establish context
  • identify elements and techniques that make advertisements, logos and symbols effective and draw on this knowledge to create their own visual effects
  • realize that cultural influences affect the way we respond to visual effects and explain how this affects our interpretation, for example, the use of particular colours or symbols
  • realize that individuals interpret visual information according to their personal experiences and different perspectives
  • show how body language, for example, facial expression, gesture and movement, posture and orientation, eye contact and touch, can be used to achieve effects and influence meaning
  • apply knowledge of presentation techniques in original and innovative ways; explain their own ideas for achieving desired effects
  • examine and analyse text and illustrations in reference material, including online text, explaining how visual and written information work together to reinforce each other and make meaning more explicit
  • navigate the internet in response to verbal and visual prompts with confidence and familiarity; use ICT to prepare their own presentations
  • use appropriate terminology to identify a range of visual effects/formats and critically analyse their effectiveness, for example, mood, media, juxtaposition, proportion
  • analyse the selection and composition of visual presentations; select examples to explain how they achieve a particular impact, for example, dominant images, use of colour, texture, symbolism
  • identify the intended audience and purpose of a visual presentation; identify overt and subliminal messages
  • reflect on ways in which understanding the intention of a visual message can influence personal responses.

Reading (Phase 5)

  • read a wide range of texts confidently, independently and with understanding
  • work in cooperative groups to locate and select texts appropriate to purpose and audience
  • participate in class, group or individual author studies, gaining an in-depth understanding of the work and style of a particular author and appreciating what it means to be an author
  • identify genre (including fantasy, biography, science fiction, mystery, historical novel) and explain elements and literary forms that are associated with different genres
  • appreciate structural and stylistic differences between fiction and non- fiction; show understanding of this distinction when structuring their own writing
  • appreciate authors’ use of language and interpret meaning beyond the literal
  • devices to evoke mental images
  • recognize and understand figurative language, for example, similes, metaphors, idioms
  • make inferences and be able to justify them
  • identify and describe elements of a story—plot, setting, characters, theme—and explain how they contribute to its effectiveness
  • compare and contrast the plots of two different but similar novels, commenting on effectiveness and impact
  • distinguish between fact and opinion, and reach their own conclusions about what represents valid information
  • use a range of strategies to solve comprehension problems and deepen their understanding of a text
  • consistently and confidently use a range of resources to find information and support their inquiries
  • participate in collaborative learning, considering multiple perspectives and working with peers to co-construct new understanding
  • use the internet responsibly and knowledgeably, appreciating its uses and limitations
  • locate, organize and synthesize information from a variety of sources including the library/media centre, the internet, people in the school, family, the immediate community or the global community.            

Writing (Phase 5)

  • write independently and with confidence, showing the development of their own voice and style
  • write using a range of text types in order to communicate effectively, for example, narrative, instructional, persuasive
  • adapt writing according to the audience and demonstrate the ability to engage and sustain the interest of the reader
  • use appropriate paragraphing to organize ideas
  • develop note taking and summarizing skills.
  • use a range of vocabulary and relevant supporting details to convey meaning and create atmosphere and mood
  • use planning, drafting, editing and reviewing processes independently and with increasing competence
  • critique the writing of peers sensitively; offer constructive suggestions
  • Understand the difference between direct and reported speech.
  • Extend the use of punctuation – colon, semi colon, hyphens, brackets, direct speech
  • Recognize when and how to use standard English e.g formal situations
  • Identify active and passive voice and change sentences from the active to passive and vice versa. E.g. The mouse frightened the elephant(active) The elephant was frightened by the mouse (passive)
  • Identify and use in writing the different kind of noun, function of pronouns, agreement between nouns, pronouns and verbs
  • Explore further the range of prepositions and prepositional phrases.
  • Writes simple, compound and complex sentences accurately and investigate clauses through: identifying the main clause in a long sentence; sentences which contain more than one clause; understand how clauses are connected
  • Secure the use of the comma in embedding clauses within sentences
  • Investigate the conditional tense, using if…then, might, could, would and their uses for deduction, speculation, possibilities, hypotheses.
  • use a dictionary, thesaurus, spell checker confidently and effectively to check accuracy, broaden vocabulary and enrich their writing
  • use written language as a means of reflecting on their own learning
  • recognize and use figurative language to enhance writing, for example, similes, metaphors, idioms, alliteration
  • locate, organize, synthesize and present written information obtained from a variety of valid sources
  • develop a secure personal handwriting style which is legible.
  • use a range of tools and techniques to produce written work that is attractively and effectively presented.

PYP6 (Grade 6) Social Studies 

The social studies component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of social studies content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of social studies in the PYP is arranged into five strands: 

  • Human Systems and Economic Activities
  • Social Organization and Culture
  • Continuity and Change through Time
  • Human and Natural Environments
  • Resources and the Environment. 

These strands are concept-driven and are inextricably linked to each other. They also provide links to other subject areas of the PYP curriculum model.

PYP6 (Grade 6) Mathematics

In the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), mathematics is also viewed as a vehicle to support inquiry, providing a global language through which we make sense of the world around us. It is intended that students become competent users of the language of mathematics, and can begin to use it as a way of thinking, as opposed to seeing it as a series of facts and equations to be memorized. The aim of our Mathematics programme is to develop students into confident mathematical thinkers, with a sound knowledge of number and the creativity to apply this knowledge to solve problems in many ways. 

Instruction and assessment of Mathematics is organised around 4 strands/skills:

  • Number
  • Pattern and Function
  • Data Handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and Space

What will students will be working on this year?

Number (Phase 4)

  • model, read and use whole numbers up to millions or beyond in real-life situations
  • model, read and use ratios in real-life situations
  • model, read and use integers in real-life situations
  • convert improper fractions to mixed numbers and vice versa in real-life situations
  • simplify fractions in computation answers
  • use fractions, decimals and percentages interchangeably in real- life situation
  • select and use an appropriate sequence of operations to solve word problems
  • select an efficient method for solving a problem: mental estimation, mental computation, written algorithms, by using a calculator
  • use strategies to evaluate the reasonableness of answers
  • use mental and written strategies for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing fractions and decimals in real-life situations
  • estimate and make approximations in real-life situations involving fractions, decimals and percentages.

Pattern and Function (Phase 4)

  • understand that patterns can be generalized by a rule
  • understand exponents as repeated multiplication
  • understand the inverse relationship between exponents and roots
  • understand that patterns can be represented, analysed and generalized using tables, graphs, words, and, when possible, symbolic rules.
  • represent the rule of a pattern by using a function
  • analyse pattern and function using words, tables and graphs, and, when possible, symbolic rules.
  • select appropriate methods to analyse patterns and identify rules
  • use functions to solve problems.

Data Handling (Phase 4)

  • understand that different types of graphs have special purposes
  • understand that the mode, median, mean and range can summarize a set of data
  • understand that probability can be expressed in scale (0-1) or per cent (0%-100%)
  • understand the difference between experimental and theoretical probability.
  • collect, display and interpret data in circle graphs (pie charts) and line graphs
  • identify, describe and explain the range, mode, median and mean in a set of data
  • set up a spreadsheet using simple formulas to manipulate data and to create graphs
  • express probabilities using scale (0-1) or per cent (0%-100%).
  • design a survey and systematically collect, record, organize and display the data in a bar graph, circle graph, line graph
  • identify, describe and explain the range, mode, median and mean in a set of data
  • create and manipulate an electronic database for their own purposes
  • determine the theoretical probability of an event and explain why it might differ from experimental probability.

Measurement (Phase 4)

  • use standard units of measurement to solve problems in real-life situations involving length, mass, capacity, money and temperature
  • understand the use of standard units to measure, for example, length, mass, money, time, temperature
  • understand that tools can be used to measure
  • understand that time is measured using universal units of measure, for example, years, months, days, hours, minutes and seconds
  • read and write digital and analogue time on 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.
  • use timelines in units of inquiry and other real-life situations.

Shape and Space (Phase 4)

  • understand the common language used to describe shapes
  • understand the properties of regular and irregular polyhedral
  • understand the properties of circles
  • understand how scale (ratios) is used to enlarge and reduce shapes
  • understand systems for describing position and direction
  • understand that 2D representations of 3D objects can be used to visualize and solve problems
  • understand that geometric ideas and relationships can be used to solve problems in other areas of mathematics and in real life.
  • analyse, describe, classify and visualize 2D (including circles, triangles and quadrilaterals) and 3D shapes, using geometric vocabulary
  • describe lines and angles using geometric vocabulary
  • identify and use scale (ratios) to enlarge and reduce shapes
  • identify and use the language and notation of bearing to describe direction and position
  • create and model how a 2D net converts into a 3D shape and vice versa
  • explore the use of geometric ideas and relationships to solve problems in other areas of mathematics.
  • use geometric vocabulary when describing shape and space in mathematical situations and beyond
  • use scale (ratios) to enlarge and reduce shapes
  • apply the language and notation of bearing to describe direction and position
  • use 2D representations of 3D objects to visualize and solve problems, for example using drawings or models.

PYP6 (Grade 6) Science

The science component of the PYP is characterized by concepts and skills rather than by content. Therefore, OurPlanet ensures that a breadth and balance of science content is covered through the units of inquiry. The knowledge component of science in the PYP is arranged into four strands: 

  • Living things
  • Earth and Space
  • Materials and Matter
  • Forces and Energy.

What will students will be working on this year?

Forces and Energy (Age 9-12)

  • identify and describe different forms of energy
  • demonstrate how energy can be stored and transformed from one form to another (for example, storage of fat, batteries as a store of energy)
  • assess renewable and sustainable energy sources (for example, wind, solar, water)
  • examine ways in which the local community could be improved in relation to the conservation of energy.

Earth and space (Age 9-12)

  • Describe how natural phenomena shape the planet
  • Identify the evidence that the Earth has changed (for example, land formations in local environment)
  • Reflect on the explanations from a range of sources as to why the Earth changes.

Materials and matter (Age 9-12)

  • investigate how buildings and other structures stand up (for example, piles, buttresses, I-beam girders)
  • investigate the construction of a building or structure and identify the materials used
  • critique the impact of a structure on the natural environment
  • explain people’s responsibility regarding the use of materials from the environment.

Skills

  • Observe carefully in order to gather data
  • Use a variety of instruments and tools to measure data accurately
  • Use scientific vocabulary to explain their observations and experiences
  • Identify or generate a question or problem to be explored
  • Plan and carry out systematic investigations, manipulating variables as necessary
  • Make and test predictions
  • Interpret and evaluate data gathered in order to draw conclusions

Consider scientific models and applications of these models (including their limitations)

PYP6 (Grade 6) Arts

At OurPlanet we offer Music, Visual Arts and Drama. Each of these arts is a significant discipline in its own right, but the transdisciplinary nature of arts gives them relevance throughout the curriculum. Arts promote attitudes such as empathy and appreciation, and skills such as analysis, that help us to see the uniqueness of each person as well as explore the commonalities that connect us. Work in arts is a way of conveying meaning, sharing a culture, developing one’s sense of self, and expanding knowledge. It provides opportunity to reflect on aesthetic experience, to engage the imagination and explore what is uncertain. Through engaging with and creating artworks, learners are encouraged to reconsider familiar concepts and think about issues of culture and identity.

What will students be working on this year?

Music – Responding (Phase 4)

  • explain the role and relevance of music in their own culture, its uses and associations through place and time
  • explore different artistic presentations that are/ were innovative and their implications.
  • sing individually and in harmony

Music – Creating (Phase 4)

  • incorporate the other arts and available resources in order to broaden their creative expression
  • create music that will be continually refined after being shared with others
  • present, in small groups, innovative musical performances on a selected issue

Visual Arts – Responding (Phase 3)

  • compare, contrast and categorize artworks from a range of cultures, places and times
  • provide constructive criticism when responding to artwork.
  • recognize that different audiences respond in different ways to artworks

Visual Arts – Creating (Phase 3)

  • create artwork for a specific audience
  • use a range of strategies to solve problems during the creative process.